about us | newsletter | contact | archive | members area
Nicolae Ghibu, Certsign
Regulations will come gradually and will cover all areas»
  Features:      COUNTRY FOCUS   |   SECTOR ANALYSIS   |

Chance to clean up culture of bribery

March 2009 - From the Print Edition

With the country in a state of social and financial insecurity, Romania now faces the danger that all the skeletons the country has piled up in its cupboard over the last years will suddenly burst out and engage in a merry dance across the country, terrorising the population.
The first example is a sudden and bizarre crime wave which has emerged since January. Violent bank robberies, thefts of automatic rifles and gunfights on the streets of Romania have never been weekly events until now. Many believe that for the last decade Romania has indirectly ‘outsourced’ many of its criminals abroad, taking advantage of the open borders to allow the hard bastards to skip the country. Petty thieves and career criminals have been far happier to steal and defraud in the west, where the prize is much larger than the offer at home.
But with the global downturn reducing every nation to the same state of misery, some of these criminals, and those from other countries, may see benefits in coming to Romania. The country’s lack of experience in combating violent crime, its under-funded police and some out-of-practice security firms make the country an attractive target.
However this moment is also an opportunity for the Government to invoke the fear of national security as a means to enforce tough measures on the daily crimes that destabilise the country, such as the culture of bribery. Black market deals, which also risk further resurgence, mean more money stolen from the country’s weakening budget.
Healthcare is the most critical area. With bribery from patients to health workers topping 300 million Euro per year, this is a hefty haul of black money by-passing the cash-strapped state. Doctors, nurses and other medical staff have failed, in great numbers, to own up to the gravity of the problem, which has held the nation’s health to ransom for two decades. What senior medical groups have not publicly declared is that for one doctor in Romania to take cash from a patient before or after an operation is a crime. This is the principle for politicians or judges – so why is this so hazy when it comes to the medical profession?
But it is not as simple as putting in prison all doctors who pocket black money, although such punishments are necessary. There needs to be a mature discussion between everyone involved in this issue – citizens, local authorities, the Ministry of Health, doctors, pensioners’ groups and nurses – to pragmatically end the practice through incentives, threats and the willingness to accept a cultural shift. The sickness must be identified and the patient must want to accept the remedy, before the cure can be delivered.
Decentralising healthcare is necessary. If hospitals are placed under the control to local authorities, rather than the Ministry of Health, doctors will be more accountable to their patients. Patients, after all, are the ones who vote for the local mayor and city council. Romania needs more money for its health system – its spending is the lowest in the EU and under that of India and Albania. The private sector also has a strong role to play in improving the efficiency of the system. But to overly privatise the health service would create a mirror image of the current problem – that patients with the most cash receive the best care.

Michael Bird



COMMENTS
There are 0 comments:

 
ADD A COMMENT
 
Name
Email
Comment
Validation Code
   
 
 

0 Comments  |  5742 Views
Daily Info
Smart city is not a fad, it's a necessity

In June 2018, the ranking of the most "smart" cities in the world was published. In other words, the most advanced cities in terms of human capital, social cohesion, the econo...

Ondrej Safar, CEZ Group: "Romania can become a hub for international smart solutions providers"

"We are already in the digital age, so the upward trend of implementing smart solutions is inevitable in all areas," he tells The Diplomat-Bucharest. "Especially in terms of u...

Telekom Romania, a strong supporter of Smart City development in Romania

Just like many other countries in the world Romania is now facing an unprecedented growth of the urban population, which can be both beneficial and detrimental for the society...

In the industrial era, the fight was for finite material resources. Not anymore

Now organizations fight and develop themselves for and around their talent. In a nutshell, getting ahead in today's business world is all about attracting and inspiring an e...

Richard Sareczky, Mol Limo: "We look at expansion locations across CEE including Romania"

Consumer mobility behaviour is changing, leading to up to one out of ten cars sold in 2030 potentially being a shared vehicle and the subsequent rise of a market for fit-for-p...

 
 
   
advertising

advertising

advertising

More on Features
Romanian business - Flexibility and agility in a high-potential market

It's anniversary time, with Romania celebrating its national day at a time when its image is coming into serious question at an international level. This month is also an a...

1 Comment

Smart city is not a fad, it's a necessity

In June 2018, the ranking of the most "smart" cities in the world was published. In other words, the most advanced cities in terms of human capital, social cohesion, the ec...

1 Comment

Telekom Romania, a strong supporter of Smart City development in Romania

Just like many other countries in the world Romania is now facing an unprecedented growth of the urban population, which can be both beneficial and detrimental for the soci...

1 Comment

In the industrial era, the fight was for finite material resources. Not anymore

Now organizations fight and develop themselves for and around their talent. In a nutshell, getting ahead in today's business world is all about attracting and inspiring a...

1 Comment

True hospitality in Bucharest

Interview with Lior Bebera, General Manager InterContinental Bucharest

1 Comment

Richard Sareczky, Mol Limo: "We look at expansion locations across CEE including Romania"

Consumer mobility behaviour is changing, leading to up to one out of ten cars sold in 2030 potentially being a shared vehicle and the subsequent rise of a market for fit-fo...

2 Comments

Ondrej Safar, CEZ Group: "Romania can become a hub for international smart solutions providers"

"We are already in the digital age, so the upward trend of implementing smart solutions is inevitable in all areas," he tells The Diplomat-Bucharest. "Especially in terms o...

1 Comment